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00:00
Rossini - Il Barbiere di Siviglia
PG02:39:001988HD
Gabrielle Ferro conducts the Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra and Cologne City Opera Choir in a production of Giacchino Rossini’s Il Barbiere di Siviglia. Michael Hampe’s humorous direction of this 1988 live performance at the Schwetzinger Festspiele stands out with its high tempo that makes for a highly exuberant production. Among the soloists are Cecilia Bartoli, David Kuebler, Gino Quilico, Carlos Feller and Robert Lloyd. Rossini was only 24 years old when he wrote his seventeenth and most famous opera, Il Barbiere di Siviglia, in an astonishing three weeks in 1816.
02:39
Europakonzert 2000 from Berlin
G01:38:002000HD
Mikhail Pletnev (piano), Karita Mattila (soprano), Violeta Urmana (alto), Thomas Moser (tenor), Eike Wilm Schulte (bass), Swedish Radio Choir, Eric Ericson Chamber Choir, Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra, conductor: Claudio Abbado. Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827): Piano Concerto No. 2 in B flat major, Op. 19 - Symphony No. 9 in D minor, Op. 125. The European Concert has been a tradition of the Berliner Philharmoniker since 1991. The musicians commemorate the anniversary of the orchestra's founding on May 1st, 1882, playing in different European cities. In 2000, the orchestra played at home in the Berlin Philharmonic Hall.
04:17
Discovering Masterpieces – Mahler – Symphony No. 5
G00:26:002004HD
Watch the series ‘Discovering Masterpieces’! Your audio-visual concert guide to the great masterpieces of classical music. The series brings you 20 half-hour documentaries on 20 classical masterpieces: acclaimed experts, famous soloists and outstanding conductors take you on a journey back to the time and place of composition. In this documentary, Gustav Mahler’s Symphony No. 5. The musical canvas and emotional scope of this work are huge. Herbert von Karajan said once that when you hear Mahler's Fifth, “you forget that time has passed. A great performance of the Fifth is a transforming experience.” The English lecturer and musician Jeremy Barham introduces the work at the piano and reflects on the secrets of the composition.
04:44
CMIM - Quarter Finals - Satriya Krisna
G01:04:002018HD
Felix Justin accompanies tenor Satriya Krisna (Indonesia, 1986) during the first round of the Art Song competition of the Concours musical international de Montréal of 2018 (CMIM). The program features Der Kuss, Op. 128 by Beethoven, Schubert’s Rastlose Liebe (D. 138), Schumann’s Widmung (from ‘Myrthen’, Op. 25), Rêve d’amour, Op. 5/2 by Fauré, Frank Bridge’s Fair Daffodils (H. 51) and Rachmaninov’s Vesennié vody, Op. 14/11. Founded in 2002, the CMIM is an annual event that draws thousands of spectators to concert halls, as well as listeners on the radio and the web. The competition seeks to discover and support musicians who demonstrate exceptional mastery of their art. It’s the only international competition in North America to be held annually and to present three disciplines (voice-violin-piano) in a three-year rotation.
05:48
TEMKO - Darkness Rises
G00:11:002017HD
What does outer space sound like? Composer Aart Strootman, artist in residence at the Tilburg Theatre and winner of the Gaudeamus Award in 2017, pondered this question. He analysed the last data NASA received in 2003 from its space probe Pioneer 10 and translated its sounds to mysterious music for his ensemble TEMKO. The ephemeral, long lines, the short outbursts, the electronics, and the voices all together made for a truly cosmic experience. Last year, Strootman arranged this insinuating score for the South Netherlands Philharmonic, for his own TEMKO to play along with the orchestra. The result was even more insinuating, thanks in part to the footage of space impressions Dries Alkemade made to accompany the music. Because of the many requests to repeat the programme, Darkness Rises returns unchanged as a part of November Music. Like last year, Karel Deseure will conduct. A mind-boggling experience for anyone who has not yet had a chance to see and hear the show and a great opportunity to discover new layers for those who did see it before.
06:00
Buxtehude - Abendmusik
G01:38:002017HD
Dietrich Buxtehude is one of the founding fathers of the 17th century German school, whose influence on composers such as Johann Sebastian Bach, his spiritual son, cannot be overestimated. Not only was he an indisputable master of organ music, but also a prolific composer whose oeuvre consists of more than 200 works. Buxtehude spent his life traveling between Lübeck and Helsingborg, Hamburg and Copenhagen. Very innovative, at a pivotal time in the history of music, Buxtehude established the ‘Abendmusiken’ (Evening Concerts) that were introduced by his predecessor Franz Tunder on the five Sundays preceding Christmas. Let’s us join the Masques ensemble and the Vox Luminis choir and discover 17th century baroque music and the composer Buxtehude through his vocal compositions, ranging from spiritual concert, choral, aria to cantata parties. The ensembles are led by Olivier Fortin and Lionel Meunier. This concert was recorded in 2017 at Centre Amuz in Antwerp, Belgium.
07:38
Jaroussky sings Bach & Telemann
G01:22:002016HD
The film Jaroussky sings Bach & Telemann is a portrait of a very special vocalist, and of two exceptional composers. When Philippe Jaroussky - whose angelic voice seems almost timeless, not belonging to any one epoque or decade - sings works by Telemann and Bach, it becomes abundantly clear that the sheer emotional force and the purifying power of their music have not diminished over the centuries. The works performed in this film are Telemann's Jesus liegt in letzten Zügen and Sinfonia from Brockes-Passion; Der am Ölberg zagende Jesus, and Bach's Sinfonia from Ich hatte viel Bekümmernis and Ich habe genug.
09:00
CMIM - Finals - Clara Osowski
G00:59:002018HD
Olivier Godin accompanies mezzo-soprano Clara Osowski (USA, 1986) during the finals of the Art Song competition of the Concours musical international de Montréal of 2018 (CMIM). The program opens with Schubert’s An Sylvia (D. 891), La mort d’Ophélie (H. 92A) by Berlioz and Abschied von Frankreich and Gebet from Schumann’s Gedichte der Königin Maria Stuart, Op. 135. Osowski continues with Robert Fleming’s song cycle The Confession Stone (Songs of Mary), after which she concludes the final, performing Schubert’s Die junge Nonne D. 828 and A Prayer to Saint Catherine by Virgil Thomson. Founded in 2002, the CMIM is an annual event that draws thousands of spectators to concert halls, as well as listeners on the radio and the web. The competition seeks to discover and support musicians who demonstrate exceptional mastery of their art. It’s the only international competition in North America to be held annually and to present three disciplines (voice-violin-piano) in a three-year rotation.
10:00
Beethoven - Symphony No. 9
G01:10:002001HD
Beethoven's Symphony no 9 is interpreted by the Berlin Philharmonic under former chief conductor Claudio Abbado at the Berliner Philharmonie in 2001. The recording features interpretations that are the fruit of decades of Claudio Abbado’s involvement with Beethoven. Listening to the music, one hears how the Berlin Philharmonic transforms Abbado’s musical intentions into sound – there is a sense of unity that can only be achieved through many years of shared artistic experience and attention to detail.
11:10
Bach - Partitas for Solo Violin (BWV 1001-1006)
G01:14:002006HD
Gidon Kremer’s return to J. S. Bach’s partitas is a major event. Kremer’s first recording of these works was released almost a quarter of a century ago. In this recording from 2006, Kremer once again takes on the greatest challenge for any violinist: Bach’s magnificent “Sonatas and Partitas for Solo Violin” (BWV 1001-1006), which Kremer himself calls the “Himalayas” of violin music. With these pieces, Bach firmly established the technical capability of the violin as a solo instrument. The partitas served as archetypes for solo violin pieces by later generations of composers. This rendition of the collection displays Kremer’s very personal sense of spontaneity and a readiness to take risks. Yet it is also marked by the structural awareness of an exceptional musician who, in a unique way, does justice both to the polyphonic wealth of the compositions and to their juxtaposition of dance elements and reflective profoundness.
12:25
Mozart on Tour - Episode 13: Vienna III
G01:39:001990HD
The 13-part Mozart on Tour series chronicles the journey of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart across Europe. In 1791, with his life cruelly and rapidly ending, Mozart once again turned to the compositional style which reflected his personality: the concerto for piano and orchestra. His last piano concerto, which turned out to be an uplifting composition, regales its audience with a lyrical children's song, invoking the joys of youth and springtime. In a fitting finale to this series, soloist Aleksander Madzar and the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra directed by Andre Previn join forces in a performance of Mozart's Piano Concerto No. 27, KV 595, recorded at Vienna's Schönbrunn palace.
14:04
Classical Film Music
G01:29:002014HD
English conductor and pianist Wayne Marshall leads the Orchestre national d’Île-de-France in a special concert celebrating classical music in film. The extensive program opens with the overture of Rossini’s The Thieving Magpie and concludes with Brahms’ Hungarian Dance No. 5. In between we are treated to renditions of Mussorgsky’s Night on Bald Mountain, Gerswhin’s Rhapsody in Blue, Duke Ellington’s C Jam Blues, Wagner’s Ride of the Valkyries, Barber’s Adagio for Strings, Rimsky-Korsakov’s Flight of the Bumblebee, the Adagietto of Mahler’s Symphony No. 5, and Strauss’ Emperor Waltz. Each of the evening’s featured works has found its way onto the silver screen in one way or another. This concert was recorded at the Salle Pleyel, Paris, in 2014.
15:33
Sibelius – Symphony No. 2
G01:14:002015HD
In 2013, the Finnish conductor Hannu Lintu was appointed principal conductor of the Finnish Radio Symphony Orchestra. Lintu studied piano and cello at the Sibelius Academy and the Turku conservatorium in Sweden’s southeast. He started conducting at the Sibelius Academy. His many concerts with the Finnish Radio Symphony Orchestra in 2012 made him the obvious replacement for Sakari Oramo, who, after many years as conductor and concert master, terminated his contract in 2012. The orchestra specializes in the performance of Finnish music, but also performs the great masterpieces of Gustav Mahler and Béla Bartók. The Finnish composer Jean Sibelius is the orchestra’s favourite, as well as the conductor. In cooperation with Finland’s national public broadcasting company Yle, all seven Sibelius symphonies are recorded and broadcast. After a brief spoken introduction about the piece, the orchestra performs the complete symphony. Sibelius composed his Symphony No. 2 between 1901 and 1902. It is one of his most popular symphonies. It marks the transition from a youthful to a more mature Sibelius. Large selections of the piece were written in Italy, and the Russian influence is replaced by an undefined southern ingredient: the piece is breathing warmth throughout. However, darkness has not completely disappeared and becomes apparent in the second movement, as the Russian influence makes a comeback and the spicy, all-embracing melody is reprised in the finale’s apotheosis.
16:48
Mahler - Symphony No. 5
G01:14:002004HD
The Lucerne Festival Orchestra performs Gustav Mahler's Symphony No. 5 under the direction of Claudio Abbado. This unique orchestra was formed as part of the annual festival in Lucerne, Switzerland.
18:02
Celebrate St. Patrick 2018
G01:33:002018HD
Join composer and presenter John Anderson as he conducts a reflective and celebratory event honouring Saint Patrick. Set in the magnificent St Patrick's RC Cathedral, choirs from all over the island of Ireland and further join in a unique evening of music and spoken word. Nowhere is the commemoration of Saint-Patrick more meaningful as in the city of Armagh in Northern Ireland, where Saint Patrick built his first stone church. From this city, all along the Saint Patrick’s pilgrimage trail to Downpatrick, there are many sights connected to his life. In the cathedral that bears his name, an evening with music and entertainment is presented to celebrate Saint Patrick. The concert and film, which featured choirs, musicians and performers from the North, South, East and West of Ireland, takes viewers on a journey through Saint Patrick’s former home via songs and musical pieces from both religious and secular traditions, showcasing not only the cathedral but also the landscapes of Armagh and Ireland’s Ancient East.
19:36
TEMKO - Darkness Rises
G01:10:002017HD
What does outer space sound like? Composer Aart Strootman, artist in residence at the Tilburg Theatre and winner of the Gaudeamus Award in 2017, pondered this question. He analysed the last data NASA received in 2003 from its space probe Pioneer 10 and translated its sounds to mysterious music for his ensemble TEMKO. The ephemeral, long lines, the short outbursts, the electronics, and the voices all together made for a truly cosmic experience. Last year, Strootman arranged this insinuating score for the South Netherlands Philharmonic, for his own TEMKO to play along with the orchestra. The result was even more insinuating, thanks in part to the footage of space impressions Dries Alkemade made to accompany the music. Because of the many requests to repeat the programme, Darkness Rises returns unchanged as a part of November Music. Like last year, Karel Deseure will conduct. A mind-boggling experience for anyone who has not yet had a chance to see and hear the show and a great opportunity to discover new layers for those who did see it before.
20:47
TEMKO - Darkness Rises
G00:12:002017HD
What does outer space sound like? Composer Aart Strootman, artist in residence at the Tilburg Theatre and winner of the Gaudeamus Award in 2017, pondered this question. He analysed the last data NASA received in 2003 from its space probe Pioneer 10 and translated its sounds to mysterious music for his ensemble TEMKO. The ephemeral, long lines, the short outbursts, the electronics, and the voices all together made for a truly cosmic experience. Last year, Strootman arranged this insinuating score for the South Netherlands Philharmonic, for his own TEMKO to play along with the orchestra. The result was even more insinuating, thanks in part to the footage of space impressions Dries Alkemade made to accompany the music. Because of the many requests to repeat the programme, Darkness Rises returns unchanged as a part of November Music. Like last year, Karel Deseure will conduct. A mind-boggling experience for anyone who has not yet had a chance to see and hear the show and a great opportunity to discover new layers for those who did see it before.
21:00
Tales of Two Cities: Leipzig-Damascus Coffee House
G01:39:002017HD
The Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra also known simply as Tafelmusik, is a Toronto-based Canadian baroque orchestra, specialised in early music. Its musical director is Jeanne Lamon. Together with the Trio Arabica they celebrate the music and culture in the eighteenth century. The cities of Leipzig and Damascus both lay at the crossroads of ancient trading routes and are important centres of scholarship and famous for their coffee houses, where music was performed by the most brilliant musicians of the day. This concert presents works by Bach, Telemann, Handel and treasures of classical Arabic music. In this cross-cultural café, music, words, and images are used to explore the ways in which people separated by great distances are bound together by trade, ideas, and art. Recorded at the Aga Khan Museum in Toronto. Created by Alison Mackay and staging by Marshall Pynkoski.
22:39
Shostakovich Symphony No. 5
G01:20:002008HD
The Royal Flemish Philharmonic ‘deFilharmonie’ specializes in the historically informed performance of various classical music styles. deFilharmonie’s unique character is shaped by several conductors, such as the Dutch conductor Edo de Waart and the Flemish conductor Philippe Herreweghe. Given his specific background and experience, Herreweghe focuses on the music of the Romantic era and before. The orchestra holds an unusual position in the Flemish music landscape due to its unique nation- and worldwide concert series. Concerts at the Musikverein in Vienna, the Festspielhaus Baden-Baden and the Concertgebouw in Amsterdam have drawn crowds. This concert was performed at Antwerp’s Queen Elisabeth Hall under the baton of the Dutch conductor Jaap van Zweden. On the programme is the Symphony No. 5 in D minor by Dmitri Shostakovich.